UMD AASU Presents – FUEL The Legacy: The Life and Activism of Yuri Kochiyama

The Asian American Student Union is proud to present FUEL The Legacy!

The conference will be held on Saturday, November 8th from 9am to 4pm in the Atrium in the Stamp Student Union. This year’s theme is commemorating the life and activism of Yuri Kochiyama. FUEL aims to educate and develop leadership among UMD’s Asian American Pacific Islander community. We will have open discussions about the problems of pervasive racism and patriarchy. We will also highlight the achievements of Black and Asian solidarity, of intersectional feminism, and of effective campaigning and organizing.

FUELFlyer2

FUEL Legacy Flyer for Fall 2014

The official FUEL the Legacy web site is now live! Visit ter.ps/fuel2014 to register!
View the program line-up, speaker bios, and events here! FUEL Legacy 2014
Check out the Facebook event for any updates: https://www.facebook.com/events/756269161100313/
If you have any questions, please contact AASU’s co-Vice Presidents of Advocacy:
Andrew Mayton: amayton@umd.edu
Kalyn Cai: kalyncai@umd.edu
Advertisements

LATIN@ Monologues – Tuesday October 14th

LATIN@ MONOLOGUES IS BACK THIS YEAR FOR THE SECOND TIME!

1912144_10204020181678936_5354073176351008416_n

Latin@ Monologues is an open mic event where we provide a stage for anyone who would like to share their stories and experiences in regards to Latino issues and/or Latino identity through just about any medium. Whether it be poetry, dance, music, theater, paint, or any other art. Come share your story as an individual, couple, or group! *This event is NOT exclusive to Latinos. Please come, bring your friends, and share in identity, self-discovery, and empowerment with us! – Presented by PLUMAS – Political Latinos United Movement for Action in Society, UMD

TUESDAY OCTOBER 14th 6-8PM in the Prince George’s Room of Stamp Student Union University of Maryland College Park

Monday September 29th – Migrant Children Vigil and Call to Action!

On Monday, September 29th, University of Maryland students are organizing a vigil and march on the White House for the migrant children of Central America imprisoned in detention centers here in the United States.

1557293_377824362365105_5985205851544242585_o
A vigil is a somber space to express support on an issue or person/s in need of assistance. The vigil in support of the child migrants has been ongoing at St. John’s Church since early July, and different organizations and universities host a vigil every Monday. Starting at 6:30PM, we will have a series of guest speakers including student testimonies, music, and performances to show our solidarity with migrant children. See the facebook event page here – > UMD Unity Quilt, Vigil and March

These children are being detained in facilities that resemble dog kennels, without adequate access to food, healthcare, blankets, or books. These conditions are dehumanizing! not only metaphorically, but literally. We didn’t cross the border, the border crossed us and no person is illegal simply based on where they were born. People have been moving across the Americas for thousands of years. Movement is a part of life and freedom, and this event is part of the movement to address this injustice. We will also proudly present our growing quilt that expresses solidarity of all UMD students, faculty, and staff that stand behind the migrant children.

A UMD Charter Bus is leaving STAMP Student Union at 5:00PM and returning to campus by 8:30PM (contact plumas.umd@gmail.com to reserve your seat!). The students will be assembling at St. John’s Episcopal Church (1525 H St NW DC) at 6:00PM and the vigil starts at 6:30PM.

Check out the month of action planned by PLUMAS (A Latino Social Justice Student Group)!

Closing University of Maryland’s Art Library – Teachers, Students Petition to Stop It!

“Captain! UMD is closing the Art Library! What should we do?!”

“Engage maximum snark!”

Surprise! Surprise. The University of Maryland is being neo-liberal again. In their drive to make College Park the model commodified-liberal-consumerist campus, our glorious all-powerful campus leaders are now closing the Art Library without so much as consulting the Department of Art, the Department of Art History and Archeology, or the campus community at large.

“We don’t have enough money to keep it open” they say, yet is this really the case? President Loh recently sent the terp community an email regarding UMD’s single largest donation ever  – $40 million! We also learned of plans to build a $140 million dollar state-of-the-art education and innovation center with this money – where the other $100 million is coming from is still unclear. While this is a huge and generous gift, and that’s really awesome, wouldn’t it be nice if the university spent $100 million on lowering tuition and making education more accessible? or wouldn’t be nice if even a fraction of this kind of money was spent raising campus workers’ and adjunct professors’ wages and benefits?

Isn’t it funny that at the same time high-tech $100+ million buildings associated with computer science, entrepreneurship, technology and innovation, and national security, spring up maniacally all around campus, we have to close down Arts and Humanities facilities because we “don’t have enough money?”

The prioritization of profit over humanities, arts, and culture, means a campus with a lot of STEMs but no roots. Terrapins who want to keep art and culture alive at UMD are organizing to halt the closing of this awesome library.

main-entrance-2

The first step you can take to help save the Art Library is by signing the petition below.

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/save-the-university-of-1.fb51?source=s.icn.fb&r_by=11342799

The second step is to follow @SaveUMDArtLib on twitter for more information on the campaign. #SaveTheLibrary

Presenting the 2014-15 UMD Disorientation Guide! (color-print version)

Now presenting . . . (drum roll ….wait, drum roll! not “drum circle”) THE 2014-15 UMD Disorientation Guide!

This year’s Guide is the product of the work of dozens of students, workers, activists, artists, writers, poets, collaborators, comrades, and friends – from the University of Maryland and beyond – organized by RadicalRush and students in Co-op Housing University of Maryland, with support of dozens more mentors, housemates, friends, and family.

An extended online version with more articles and original content is coming soon! THANKS SO MUCH to all the people that made this possible and to every contributor who sent content, ideas, love, and support to make this zine great!

Disorientation Guide Cover by Savannah Staubs, 2014

Disorientation Guide Cover by Savannah Staubs, 2014

Click on the image above or click here to read our zine! 2014-15 UMD Disorientation Guide (Color – Print Version) #disorient2K14

Shout-out to all of our amazing people who made donations: Abishek Gopal, Avid Antonelli, Charles Imwold, Cici Bisogno, Corey Rennolds, Tim Dawson, and our anonymous contributors as well! Immortals will appear in the upcoming extended version online guide! 😀
If you would like to contribute to help us print hard-copy zines for incoming students at the First Look Fair or make future disorientation guides possible, please click on our link and make a donation. We have neat personalized prizes for donators too! Have a radical year! – UMD Radical Rush and Disorientation Guide

Excerpt from the 2014-15 UMD Disorientation Guide – COMING SEPT 17!!!

The following is an excerpt from an article in the 2014-15 UMD Disorientation Guide on the nature of the relationship between Students and the University…

 

The Student Worker – Challenging the Concept of the Student Consumer 

In a wave of recession-era austerity measures, many states across the country dramatically reduced funding for education resulting in a disturbing increase in the privatization of our education system. Under this model, education becomes a commodity, just another thing to be bought and sold, where students are nothing more than consumers. The thing sold? Education? Universities offer students the promise of a livable future, luring young hopefuls with the institution’s credibility and bourgeois amenities before saddling students, their parents, and our country with crushing debt; a financial burden that weakens the economy and causes significant social strife.

Thinking of students as debtors makes invisible the ways students are actually workers. We are told that our education comes handed down to us by our professors, but we know better. We teach each other and ourselves, often learning as much on our own time than in lecture. Perhaps most important – through research, thesis papers, and schoolwork – students develop a body of academic knowledge that feeds the institution and raises the university’s credibility and standing.

For example, what do you call what you do at school? Work, right? It’s called “Schoolwork” or “Homework” because it IS work. Alongside professors, adjunct faculty, TA’s, and janitors, students ARE the university. Portraying students as consumers rather than the engine that powers the university legitimizes student apathy and complacency. Many of us are also workers in the traditional sense too, using our wages to pay for living expenses, tuition, and books, often to the very university that employs us.

 

Students propel human knowledge forward!!! That’s some important shit that many like to ignore.

Furthermore, education is not merely an investment in one’s own self-interest, but also a public good. After graduation, students are going to go on to add value to the whole economy and help their communities in ways they might not have been capable of before. Students are ambassadors for the future workforce and voting population. Just like the research we produce, our educated selves are sold on the labor market. Universities serve as sites of production for the skills our future employers need to continue functioning. Our educations are a commodity we make and sell, and yet only the university and their corporate partners truly profit.

 

What does it mean when students are paying exorbitant prices to produce their own education, the fabric of the institution, and the public good of education? It means we are getting ripped off. We should be getting paid! It means society is getting ripped off. Students should be paid for the work they do! While such ideals may be at home in a more enlightened future, lets at the very least demand an end to tuition hikes and the commodification of an educated society.

 

01011003

Yeah, the radical femme on the right is pissed and they’re going to get even more pissed if we have another tuition hike. Get ready for our zine which will drop September 17th at the University of Maryland College Park, First Look Fair!!! In the meantime, check out our old disorientation guide here -> 2013-14 UMD Disorientation Guide

Days of Action! University of Maryland Students Demonstrate for Workers in Bangladesh!

Students DEMAND University of Maryland Brands Sign the Bangladesh Fire and Building Safety Accord – In Coordination with USAS Day of Action 

Post-Action Picture Flyer2

On Wednesday April 23, 2014, UMD students honored the 1,129 Bangledeshi workers who died in the Rana Plaza factory collapse the day before the one-year-anniversary of the disaster on April 24, 2013.  United Students Against Sweatshops (USAS) and UMD students are joining together to pay their respects to the families and victims of the collapse and to demand companies like JanSport take action to prevent disasters like this in the future. 150 brands have signed the Accord including American Eagle, H&M, and Adidas, but VF Corporation, owner of JanSport, VF Imagewear, and other affiliates, have thus far evaded responsibility for the safety of their workers. 18 schools across the nation have already required their licensees to sign the Accord, including American University just yesterday!—it’s time for UMD to join them.

USAS organizers and Bangladesh workers met with University of Maryland Administration officials to discuss suspending JanSport licenses in a bid to pressure them to sign the Accord, however university representatives indicated they would not take action on this issue. So students groups Justice at Maryland and Community Roots teamed up to take the message directly to the UMD students and consumers to boycott JanSport products. The event turned out really well and the reception from the UMD community was fantastic. We had so many great conversations, words of support, and got connected to more students and faculty who want to become involved. On Thursday April 24 2014 – the one-year-anniversary of the Rana Plaza factory collapse – we are delivering a letter addressed to University of Maryland President Loh to ask him to suspend the license agreement with JanSport and affiliates if they do not sign the Accord and comply with UMD business ethics standards.  Also, a second demonstration is planned to coincide the the USAS National Day of Action TODAY (Thursday 4/24) at 12:30PM in STAMP Student Union.

How will signing the Accord prevent this catastrophe from happening again?

While no legislation can guarantee this could never happen again as long as sweatshops exist, the Accord requires collaboration with workers’ protection groups, rigorous inspections and public transparency, and it’s legally binding to the companies that sign it.

What can you do to help?

  • BOYCOTT JANSPORT PRODUCTS
  • sign our online petition at change.org
  • Share information about the Accord and talk to other people about it!
  • Demand that University of Maryland President Wallace Loh cut ties with VF Corporation, owner of JanSport and VF Imagewear, and its affiliates.
  • Demand that President Loh require current and future licensees at the University of Maryland to sign onto the Bangladesh Safety Accord.